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File:Hurricane Earl 1998 tornadoes.gif

On September 3, 1998, Category 1 Hurricane Earl made landfall near Panama City, Florida. The storm caused moderate damage along the Florida Panhandle and in the Southern United States, killing three people, one from a tornado, and left $79 million (1998 USD; $104.4 million 2009 USD) in damages. Between September 2 and 3, the outer bands of the storm produced severe thunderstorms that spawned 16 tornadoes.[1]

Confirmed tornadoesEdit

Confirmed
Total
Confirmed
F0
Confirmed
F1
Confirmed
F2
Confirmed
F3
Confirmed
F4
Confirmed
F5
16 7 5 4 0 0 0

September 2 eventEdit

List of reported tornadoes - Wednesday, September 2, 1998
F#
Location
County
Coord.
Time (EDT)
Path length
Damage
Florida
F0 W of Land O' Lakes Pasco 28°14′N 82°32′W / 28.233°N 82.533°W / 28.233; -82.533 1423 0.1 miles (0.16 km) The first tornado spawned by Hurricane Earl touched down near Florida State Road 54. The brief F0 tornado caused no known damage along its path.[2]
F1 S of Brooksville Hernando 28°30′N 82°23′W / 28.5°N 82.383°W / 28.5; -82.383 1506 3 miles (4.8 km) The second tornado touched down in Hernando County less than an hour after the first. Along the tornado's path, five homes were damaged, numerous trees were snapped or uprooted and several power lines were downed. Rated F1, the tornado caused $25,000 in damages.[3]
F0 Ozello area Citrus 28°49′N 82°39′W / 28.817°N 82.65°W / 28.817; -82.65 1530 0.1 miles (0.16 km) The third tornado touched down in the bayou area of Citrus County near Ozello. The brief F0 tornado caused no known damage along its track.[4]
F0 Nobleton area Hernando, Sumter 28°38′N 82°17′W / 28.633°N 82.283°W / 28.633; -82.283 1540 21 miles (34 km) A small but unusually long lived F0 tornado tracked for roughly 1 mile (1.6 km) through Hernando County, damaging trees, after touching down in Nobleton before crossing into Sumter County.[5] Once in Sumter County, the tornado made multiple touchdowns along a 20 miles (32 km) path through swamp and semi-wooded areas before dissipating near County Road 472. Damages from the tornado amounted to $5,000.[6]
F1 Port Canaveral area Brevard 28°25′N 80°32′W / 28.417°N 80.533°W / 28.417; -80.533 1940 2 miles (3.2 km) A brief F1 tornado touched down in Port Canaveral, causing severe damage to several buildings. Along the tornado's 2 miles (3.2 km) path, fourteen cars, eight condominiums, four businesses, a fire house and a mobile home were damaged.[7] Two families had to be evacuated from one of the damaged condominiums as its roof was blown off. Two restaurants had their roofs completely blown off by the tornado. One person was injured after his truck was flipped over by the tornado.[8] In all, the tornado caused $6 million in damages, the most of any tornado spawned by Earl.[7]
F1 Eastern St. George Island Franklin 29°44′N 84°53′W / 29.733°N 84.883°W / 29.733; -84.883 2130 1 mile (1.6 km) A brief F1 tornado caused moderate to severe damage to six homes on St. George Island.[9] One home had three windows broken and the fence surrounding the property destroyed.[10] In all, the tornado caused $150,000 in damages.[9]

September 3 eventEdit

List of reported tornadoes - Thursday, September 3, 1998
F#
Location
County
Coord.
Time (EDT)
Path length
Damage
Florida
F2 NE of Crystal River Citrus 28°58′N 82°30′W / 28.967°N 82.5°W / 28.967; -82.5 0505 5 miles (8.0 km) The strongest tornado spawned by Hurricane Earl in Florida touched down around 5:05 am EDT in Citrus County. The 50 yd (46 m)Template:Convert/test/Aon wide tornado made multiple touchdowns along a 5 miles (8.0 km) path. Rated F2, the tornado destroyed seven mobile homes and one two-story home and damaged 25 other homes. Two people were injured in the destroyed home. In all, the tornado caused $500,000 in damages.[11]
South Carolina
F2 Saint Helena area Beaufort, Colleton 32°21′N 80°26′W / 32.35°N 80.433°W / 32.35; -80.433 0728 18 miles (29 km) 1 Death– The strongest tornado spawned by Earl was also the only killer tornado from the storm. Tracking for 18 miles (29 km), the tornado destroyed 13 buildings and damaged 13 others, most of them were mobile homes. The worst damage was concentrated along a 3 miles (4.8 km) path through Fripp Island to near Morgan Island. The fatality occurred in a mobile home after it was lifted off the ground and thrown, being destroyed upon impact. Numerous trees were also snapped and uprooted by the tornado. Four other people were injured along the tornado's path. In all, the tornado caused $360,000 in damages.[12][13]
F1 SSE of Green Pond Colleton 32°38′N 80°34′W / 32.633°N 80.567°W / 32.633; -80.567 1228 1 mile (1.6 km) A brief F1 tornado touched down on a private farm, the roof off a barn was blown off several trees were uprooted.[14]
F2 Moncks corner area Berkeley 33°11′N 80°11′W / 33.183°N 80.183°W / 33.183; -80.183 1230 7 miles (11 km) Around 12:30 pm EDT a large F2 tornado, estimated to be a quarter mile wide (400 m), touched down in Berkeley County. Tracking for 7 miles (11 km), the tornado destroyed 19 homes and damaged 73 others. Nine people were injured along its path. In all, damages amounted to $2.8 million.[15]
F0 S of Holly Hill (1st tornado) Orangeburg 33°16′N 80°25′W / 33.267°N 80.417°W / 33.267; -80.417 1320 1 mile (1.6 km) Two brief F0 tornadoes touched down over an open field simultaneously.[16]
F0 S of Holly Hill (2nd tornado) Orangeburg 33°16′N 80°25′W / 33.267°N 80.417°W / 33.267; -80.417 1320 1 mile (1.6 km) Two brief F0 tornadoes touched down over an open field simultaneously.[16]
F0 Choppee area Georgetown 33°34′N 79°23′W / 33.567°N 79.383°W / 33.567; -79.383 1625 0.1 miles (0.16 km) An F0 tornado briefly touched down over an open field.[17]
Georgia
F2 Sylvania area Screven 32°45′N 81°39′W / 32.75°N 81.65°W / 32.75; -81.65 1023 8 miles (13 km) The only tornado produced by Earl in Georgia was a 350 yd (320 m)Template:Convert/test/Aon wide F2 that tracked for 8 miles (13 km). Five mobile homes and one business were destroyed, 15 mobile homes sustained major damage and five others sustained minor damage. Seven people were injured by the tornado. In all, the tornado caused $435,000 in damages.[18]
North Carolina
F0 S of Cape Carteret Carteret 34°39′N 77°03′W / 34.65°N 77.05°W / 34.65; -77.05 2130 2 miles (3.2 km) The first of two tornadoes to touch down in North Carolina first struck the Emerald Isle area where a porch was destroyed, a storage shed was blown over and a mobile home was knocked off its foundation. The tornado next impacted Bogue where the most severe damage took place. Up to 15 mobile homes sustained minor damage and a camper was destroyed. In all, the tornado caused $50,000 in damages.[19]
F1 Ocracoke area Hyde 35°07′N 75°59′W / 35.117°N 75.983°W / 35.117; -75.983 2145 0.1 miles (0.16 km) The final tornado spawned by Earl touched down for less than a minute in Ocracoke. However, the F1 tornado destroyed one home and severely damaged another. The destroyed home was reportedly picked up 20 to 25 ft (6.1 to 7.6 m)Template:Convert/test/Aon off its foundation before it exploded. In all, the tornado caused $200,000 in damages.[20]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Max Mayfield (November 17, 1998). "Hurricane Earl Preliminary Report". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/1998earl.html. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  2. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315185. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  3. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315186. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  4. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315187. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  5. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315188. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  6. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315189. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315197. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  8. The Associated Press (September 4, 1998). "Two dead after Hurricane Earl". Boca Raton News. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1291&dat=19980904&id=9cYPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=EY4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=6323,423297. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  9. 9.0 9.1 Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315200. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  10. Mireya Navarro (September 4, 1998). "Hurricane Pounds Florida With Floods and Twisters". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1998/09/04/us/hurricane-pounds-florida-with-floods-and-twisters.html. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  11. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Florida Event Report: F2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~315208. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  12. Stuart Hinson (1998). "South Carolina Event Report: F2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~339805. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  13. Stuart Hinson (1998). "South Carolina Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~339806. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  14. Stuart Hinson (1998). "South Carolina Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~339813. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  15. Stuart Hinson (1998). "South Carolina Event Report: F2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~339814. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  16. 16.0 16.1 Stuart Hinson (1998). "South Carolina Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~339817. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  17. Stuart Hinson (1998). "South Carolina Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~339821. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  18. Stuart Hinson (1998). "Georgia Event Report: F2 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~316719. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  19. Stuart Hinson (1998). "North Carolina Event Report: F0 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~333718. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 
  20. Stuart Hinson (1998). "North Carolina Event Report: F1 Tornado". National Climatic Data Center. http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwevent~ShowEvent~333719. Retrieved June 21, 2009. 

External linksEdit


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