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Freeways in metropolitan Detroit consist of several major interconnecting Interstate highways and additional supporting freeways. The Metro Detroit region has an extensive toll-free expressway system which, together with its status as a major port city, provide advantages to its location as a global business center.[1] There are no toll roads in Michigan.[2]

Traditionally, Detroiters referred to their freeways by name rather than route number. That is still true today, with most Detroiters still calling the freeways by their names, but numbers are in use as well. Other freeways are referred to only by number as in the case of I-275 and M-59:their names, if any, were never in common everyday usage. M-53, while not officially designated, is commonly called the Van Dyke Expressway.

File:Metro Detroit Freeways.svg
File:Mixing Bowl Interchange (Novi, Michigan).png
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I-75 (Walter P. Chrysler and Fisher Freeways) is the region's main north-south route, serving Flint, Pontiac, Troy, and Detroit, before continuing south (as the Detroit-Toledo and Seaway Freeways) to serve many of the communities along the shore of Lake Erie.
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I-94 (Edsel Ford Freeway & Detroit Industrial Expressway) runs east-west through Detroit and serves Ann Arbor to the west (where it continues to Chicago) and Port Huron to the northeast. The stretch of the current I-94 freeway from Ypsilanti to Detroit was one of America's earlier limited-access highways. Henry Ford built it to link his factories at Willow Run and Dearborn during World War II. It also serves the North Access to the Detroit Metro Airport in Romulus. A portion was known as the Willow Run Expressway.
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I-96 runs northwest-southeast through Livingston, Oakland and Wayne counties and has its eastern terminus in downtown Detroit. Originally named the Jeffries Freeway in Wayne County, the portion between the Fisher and the Ford was renamed by the state legislature to the Rosa Parks Memorial Highway in December 2005.[3]
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I-275 runs north-south from I-75 in the south to the junction of I-96 and I-696 in the north, providing a bypass through the western suburbs of Detroit.
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I-375 is a short spur route in downtown Detroit, an extension of the Chrysler Freeway.
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I-696 (Walter P. Reuther Freeway) runs east-west from the junction of I-96 and I-275, providing a route through the northern suburbs of Detroit. Taken together, I-275 and I-696 form a semicircle around Detroit.
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M-5 This freeway begins as the stub leftover from the Brighton-Farmington Expressway after Interstate 96 was rerouted to the Jeffries. From 1994 to 2002, it was extended north as the Haggerty Connector.[4]
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M-8 is the Davison Freeway. Opened in 1942, this was the first modern depressed limited-access freeway in America.
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M-10: The John C. Lodge Freeway runs largely parallel to I-75 from Southfield to downtown.
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M-14 runs east-west from I-275 in Livonia to Ann Arbor.
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M-39: The Southfield Freeway runs north-south from Southfield to Allen Park from I-94. North of 10 Mile Road, the freeway ends and continues as Southfield Road into Birmingham.
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M-53 (Christopher Columbus Freeway from Sterling Heights to Washington), more commonly known as the Van Dyke Expressway or Van Dyke Freeway. Continues as Van Dyke Road or Van Dyke Avenue north to Port Austin and south through Warren to Gratiot Avenue in Detroit.
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M-59 (Veterans Memorial Freeway from Utica to Pontiac), continues east as Hall Road to Clinton Township and west as various surface roads to I-96 near Howell

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Regional Advantages for International Business. World Trade Center Detroit Windsor. Retrieved on September 3, 2007.
  2. Why doesn't Michigan have toll roads.Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved on September 5, 2007. "A system of toll free highways has been viewed as important to commerce, industry, tourism, and general economic development."
  3. MICHIGAN MEMORIAL HIGHWAY ACT (EXCERPT) Act 142 of 2001, 250.1098 Rosa Parks Memorial Highway. Michigan Legislature (accessed August 18, 2006)
  4. Bessert, Christopher J. "M-5". MichiganHighways.org. http://www.michiganhighways.org/listings/MichHwys01-09.html#M-005. 

External linksEdit

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